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walter dandy portrait For those members that meet strict criteria for specific subspecialties in neurological surgery, there will be an opportunity to become a Fellow of the Dandy College of Neurosurgery (FCDN). The criteria for acceptance are as follows:

  1. Primary board certification to practice neurological surgery in the applicant's country of residence.
  2. The candidacy for the Fellowship will require the online reporting of 24 consecutive months of outcomes in the respective subspecialty.
  3. Operative logs demonstrating that the specific subspecialty the fellowship is being requested in is at least 80% of the surgeon's elective practice.
  4. Operative logs demonstrating outcomes that meet Dandy College requirements for Fellowship.
  5. Passing of an oral examination by the respective WEDNS Division Board.
  6. The FDCN will be country-specific (based on the country for which the prospective data was provided) and will not be transferable to other nations except in cases where approval is given by the respective Dandy subspecialty board.
  7. The formal certificate that will be awarded to fellows will list the specific subspecialty in which the neurosurgeon will be boarded in. For Example: FCDN (Skull Base).
  8. The Fellowship designation will be considered in one of the 12 categories listed below:

 

 

Outcome Based Elective Practice Subspecialty Classification in Neurosurgery
1. Cerebro-vascular & Endovascular Surgery For neurosurgeons whose practice is dedicated to both endovascular and microvascular procedures. In addition to the standard cerebro-vascular procedures, these neurosurgeons provide stroke coverage for their centers. The proportion of endovascular, as compared to open microvascular procedures, is up to the practitioner, provided that the above cerebro-vascular practice is no less than 80% of their total elective neurosurgical practice
2. Cerebro-vascular tr Skull Base Surgery For neurosurgeons whose practice is dedicated to complex micro-vascular and skull base surgery. The above must be no less than 80% of their total elective neurosurgical practice.
3. Functional & Pain Neurosurgery For neurosurgeons whose practice is dedicated to functional and pain related procedures. The proportion of the functional work, as compared to pain related procedures, is up to the practitioner, provided that the above practice is no less than 80% of their total elective neurosurgical practice.
4. Neurotrauma & Critical Care * For neurosurgeons who are dedicated to neurotrauma and critical care practice. The above must be no less than 80% of their total neurosurgical practice.
5. Pediatric Neurosurgery‡ For neurosurgeons whose practice is dedicated to pediatric neurosurgery. The above must be no less than 80% of their total elective neurosurgical practice.
6. Peripheral Nerve Surgery† For neurosurgeons whose practice is dedicated to peripheral nerve surgery. The above must be no less than 80% of their total elective neurosurgical practice.
7. Tumor Surgery & Neuro-Oncology For neurosurgeons whose practice and research is dedicated to tumor surgery. The above must be no less than 80% of their total elective neurosurgical practice.
8. Tumor & Skull Base Surgery For neurosurgeons whose practice is dedicated to tumor surgery, as well as skull base surgery for complex base of the skull tumors. The above must be no less than 80% of their total elective neurosurgical practice.
9. Tumor & Functional Surgery For neurosurgeons whose practice is dedicated to tumor surgery and functional neurosurgery. The proportion of tumor surgery, as compared to functional neurosurgery, is up to the practitioner, provided that the combined practice is no less than 80% of their total elective neurosurgical practice.
10. Spine Surgery For neurosurgeons whose practice is dedicated to spine surgery. The above must be no less than 80% of their total elective neurosurgical practice.
11. Spine & Pain Surgery For neurosurgeons whose practice is dedicated to spine surgery and pain procedures. The proportion of spine surgery, as compared to pain related procedures, is up to the practitioner, provided that the combined practice is no less than 80% of their total elective neurosurgical practice.
OR
12. Spine & Peripheral Nerve Surgery For neurosurgeons whose practice is dedicated to spine surgery and peripheral nerve surgery. The proportion of spine surgery, as compared to peripheral nerve surgery, is up to the practitioner, provided that the combined practice is no less than 80% of the total elective neurosurgical practice.

 

  Color indicates the key subspecialties in neurosurgery, defined based on calculations that approximately 85% of all neurosurgeons would fit into one of these four categories as indicated from review of state and nationwide databases.
* Based on the initiative articulated by the President, all neurosurgeons are expected to cover all neurosurgical emergencies, especially neurotrauma. This subspecialty category is only for those whose careers, including practice and research, are dedicated to neurotrauma and critical care.
Based on responses from the questionnaire and review of data, it is our conclusion that very few neurosurgeons can have a predominant practice of peripheral nerve surgery. This category has been included in order to present a complete classification system and to assure its formal recognition as a neurosurgical subspecialty.
Our review indicated that as pediatric neurosurgery centers of excellence emerge, there will be a natural progression towards subspecialties within this field (e.g., tumors, functional, craniofacial, spine, etc.). This specific document does not address those specific issues, which are within the jurisdiction of the subspecialty itself.